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Idaho State University

Presentation Submission for Graduate Research Symposium

If the below submission portal is not working for you, you may instead email your materials to the following email address: Graduat.svsfec8lny2t94kr@u.box.com

 

About

The Idaho State University Graduate Research Symposium provides an opportunity for our graduate students both traditional and online to share their scholarly and create works with the Pocatello Community.  The yearly symposia showcases the works of masters and doctoral students in the eight colleges represented within the Graduate School.

Students can select from a wide range of presentation styles to share their research.  The event is held yearly in the spring term and includes poster sessions, oral presentations, creative works and 3MT® Three Minute Thesis- A segment that was first held at the University of Queensland in 2008.

Participants are eligible to receive an award in the categories in which they presented. Only ISU students are eligible to receive an award. Awards are presented to students as follows:

Three Minute Thesis

  1. First Place in Three Minute Thesis Competition
  2. Second Place in Three Minute Thesis Competition
  3. Third Place in Three Minute Thesis Competition

Oral & Poster Presentations

      Top Oral Presentation in each of the following categories for a total of up to 12 awards:

  • Biological & Natural Sciences
  • Business, Economics & Public Administration
  • Education, Learning & Training
  • Engineering, Physical & Mathematical Sciences
  • Health, Nutrition & Clinical Sciences
  • Humanities, Behavioral & Social Sciences

People’s Choice award is awarded in the Poster Presentations Category.

Creative Works Display

  1. First place or Participation award as applicable

Questions?  Please email eakiaman@isu.edu .

Graduate Research Symposium Planning Committee

Amanda Eakins, EdD, Chair
Director of Graduate and Professional Student Recruitment, Engagement & Retention
Museum Building Room 412
208-282-2665
eakiaman@isu.edu

Barbara Wood Roberts, Ph.D.
Manager of Graduate Publications
Museum Building Room 413
woodbar2@isu.edu

Samuel Swanson
Communications GTA
swansamu@isu.edu

Kailey Murphy
Graduate Student Experience Intern
murpkai2@isu.edu

Saujan Acharya
Student Finance Intern
achasauj@isu.edu

Apply Here
EXTENDED Submission deadline: February 28th, 2020

The Symposium provides a great opportunity for graduate students to apply to present their research and projects. All Idaho State University Graduate Students are encouraged to apply.

The online application requires students to select one of the following categories in which they would like to identify their work.

• Biological & Natural Sciences
• Business, Economics & Public Administration
• Education, Learning & Training
• Engineering, Physical & Mathematical Sciences
• Health, Nutrition & Clinical Sciences
• Humanities, Behavioral & Social Sciences
• Creative Works [for those who are submitting creative works display]

Abstract guidelines
Abstracts should be no more than 300 words, including introduction, materials and methods, results and conclusion.

Prior to submitting, please proofread your abstract and information. The information provided in the application will be considered a final draft and may be used in event programming.

In General Abstracts should include:
• An Introduction
• Statement of hypothesis, purpose or question of study
• Methods, or sources
• Results, findings or arguments
• and discussion

Students are encouraged to attend a General Writing Clinic Tutoring Session hosted by the Graduate School. More information about the Writing Clinic can be found here.

Example Abstract

Category: Humanities, Behavioral & Social Sciences
Author: Williams, Paul
Abstract Title: Bigger On the Inside: Codifying the Chronotope of the Labyrinth
Abstract: Labyrinths appear frequently in fantasy literature. Some provide an episode in a much larger story, such as the tunnels where Frodo and Sam confront Shellob, while others provide the central setting of the story. This latter type of labyrinth functions as a polder, defined by John Clute and Roz Kaveney as “enclaves of toughened Reality, demarcated by boundaries from the surrounding world.” These labyrinth-polders frequently provide the structure for a number of fantasy stories, to the point that we can discern a specific story type based around them. Mikhail Bakhtin provides a useful tool for defining new narrative subcategories with his theory of the chronotope, which invokes both time and space to influence and fashion both theme and form within a story. Chronotopes account for the way recognizable genre fragments (characters, timing, etc.) intermix in a specific time and space. My thesis examines how Robert Holdstock, Patricia McKillip, and John Crowley exemplify what we might term “the labyrinth-as-polder story;” each creates a distinct fantastical labyrinth sequestered from the larger world that combine trials of time, space, memory, and imagination to enact transformation upon the characters. Fantasy studies is a relatively young field and much work remains to explore the genre’s various narrative types. Mikhail Bakhtin provides a useful tool for defining new narrative subcategories with his theory of the chronotope, which invokes both time and space to influence and fashion both theme and form within a story. Chronotopes account for the way recognizable genre fragments (characters, timing, etc.) intermix in a specific time and space. My study catalogues narrative echoes across my texts to define the chronotope of fantasy labyrinths, which uses a limited space to portray a vastness of story equal to—while distinct from—the sprawling landscapes of Tolkie

Word Count 289

Presentation Formats & Guidelines


3 Minute Thesis (3MT)

The Three Minute Thesis (3MT® ) is an academic research communication competition developed by The University of Queensland (UQ), Australia.
Judging Rubric 3MT 2020
All presenters must prepare 1 graphic static slide to display.
Graphic PPT Template
Presentations are limited to 3 minutes, maximum.

Upcoming 3MT Workshops
Workshop Date: 2:30 pm to 3:30 pm, March 10th, 2020 in the Graduate School Conference Room

Upload presentation graphic in the above "box" submission field by Thursday, April 2, 2020
Run-Through on Sunday, April 5 @ 1-3 in Ballroom. 3MT participants are invited to practice their presentation to get acquainted with the stage and timer.

Poster Presentation

Presentation Criteria
Research Posters will be displayed on a flat screen TV
Dimension Criteria: 54 x 30 inches (16:9 ratio)
Acceptable Formats: jpg, png
Poster PPT Template

Upcoming Poster Workshop
Workshop Date: 2:30 pm to 3:30 pm, March 2nd, 17th, 2020 in the Graduate School Conference Room

Upload posters in the above "box" submission field by Thursday, April 2, 2020

Oral Presentation

Presentation Criteria
Presentations are limited to 12 minutes, with Q&A.
Bring your own slide presentation, if applicable, and upload to computer prior to start of event session.

Upcoming Oral Presentation Rehearsals/ Mentoring
Workshop Date: 2:30 pm to 3:30 pm, March 19th, 2020 in the Graduate School Conference Room

Creative Works

Presentation Criteria
If you have any special requests about the space (an electrical outlet, spacing around your table, etc.), don’t hesitate to ask! Try to give us as much advance notice as you can, and we will do our best to make accommodations.

Frequently Asked Questions


What is the Graduate Research Symposium?

The Idaho State University Graduate Research Symposium provides an opportunity for our graduate students both traditional and online to share their scholarly and create works with the Pocatello Community. The yearly symposia showcases the works of masters and doctoral students in the eight colleges represented within the Graduate School.
Students can select from a wide range of presentation styles to share their research. The event is held yearly in the spring term and includes poster sessions, oral presentations, creative works and 3MT® Three Minute Thesis- A segment that was first held at the University of Queensland in 2008.

Who participates in the symposium?

The symposium is open to all ISU graduate students from across the disciplines and colleges who are presenting individual or collaborative research, creative work, or scholarship as part of course, thesis, minor/major, or independent study overseen by a faculty mentor. The symposium is also an ideal venue for students of the performing and fine arts to share their work with a larger audience. Business students are encouraged to share their case studies. Students are encouraged to discuss these opportunities with their faculty mentors/ advisors.

How do I apply to present?

The application process is done entirely online through our online system, Qualtrics.

Can I present ongoing research?

Yes. Typically, students who have been doing conducting research for at least two terms are well positioned to present, or those who have a course-based research project or creative work. You are encouraged to discuss your research progress with your faculty and research mentors.

Can I submit multiple research projects?

Yes, many students present both poster and oral presentations in separate sessions. You will need to submit an application for each session you would like to present.

What time will I present?

Students will be given as assigned time prior to the date of the event.

Who can attend the symposium?

That symposium is free and open to the public, so feel free to invite any friends, family, and mentors to come view your presentation.

Are there awards for Symposium presenters?

Yes, there are numerous awards for presenters in many different categories. You can review the award descriptions and eligibility requirements here.

How will the presentations be judged?

Judging will be conducted by ISU Faculty Members and Scholars/ Practitioners within the Pocatello community.

Can I volunteer at the symposium?

Yes. We love volunteers! Email eakiaman@isu.edu for more information about how you can volunteer.

Still have questions?

Please email eakiaman@isu.edu

 

 

 

 

 

2020 Keynote Speaker

Dr. Mia Tuan

 

A respected scholar and long-time academic leader, Dr. Mia Tuan assumed the deanship of the University of Washington College of Education on July 1, 2015. She previously served as associate dean of UO's Graduate School, director of its Center on Diversity & Community, and director of the sociology department’s honors program. Tuan joined UO's sociology faculty in 1996, and in 2007 joined the College of Education. Tuan has won numerous academic awards, including the 2012 Western Association of Graduate Schools (WAGS) and Education Testing Services (ETS) Award for Excellence and Innovation, for Diversifying Graduate Education in STEM Disciplines.

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2019 Keynote Speaker

Jackie Wirz, Ph.D., wearing a black spotted blouse.

Jackie Wirz, Ph.D.

2018 Keynote Speaker

Catherine M. Millett, wearing a green shirt

Catherine M. Millett, Ph.D.

Jackie Wirz is the Assistant Dean for Graduate Studies and the Director of the Career and Professional Development Center at Oregon Health & Science University. She earned her Ph.D. from Oregon Health & Science University in Biochemistry & Molecular Biology and has a B.S. from Oregon State University in Biochemistry & Biophysics.

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Catherine Millett is a senior research scientist in the Policy Evaluation and Research Center at ETS. Her research focuses on the factors leading to postsecondary readiness, access, success and completion for first generation, low-income, and minority students.  She is the Chair of the Global Access to Postsecondary (GAPS) Executive Committee.

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2017 Keynote Speaker

Charles R. Martinez Jr., Ph.D.

Charles R. Martinez, Jr., Ph.D.

2016 Keynote Speaker

 

2016 Keynote Speaker for Graduate Research Symposium

Sam Logan, Ph.D. 

Dr. Charkes R. Martinez, Jr. is a clinical psychologist, Philip H. Knight Professor, and department head in the Department of Educational Methodology, Policy, and Leadership at the University of Oregon, where he also serves as the founding director of the Center for Equity Promotion.

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Dr. Sam Logan, Assistant Professor in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University, received his BS and MS degrees from the University of Delaware in Psychology and Exercise Science. He completed his PhD in Kinesiology at Auburn University where his dissertation was awarded Auburn University’s “Outstanding Graduate School Distinguished Dissertation Award in Social Sciences”.

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